Tag Archives: #custody

SJC of Massachusetts Ruled New Standard for Modifications of Child Support

On March 12, 2013, the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts issued a binding opinion setting forth a new standard of review in cases requiring modification of child support. Prior to March 12th, the standard of review was whether there had been a “material and substantial change in circumstances” to warrant said modification.  Now, in order to modify a child support obligation, the filing party must prove that the current child support order is “inconsistent” with the application of the Child Support Guidelines. This new standard, referred to as the inconsistency standard, will be applied to child support modification cases moving forward.

However, this standard is in reality not so “new.” The SJC found that the child support statute (M.G.L c. 208, sec. 28) as passed by the legislature, in fact, applies the “inconsistency” standard, whereas the 2009 Child Support Guidelines uses the “material and substantial change in circumstances” standard. In cases where there are such conflicting rules, the statute passed by the legislature must prevail. Only time will tell how this lower standard of review will play out in the court.

For further information see Morales v. Morales, SJC-11104.

Leave a comment

Filed under Child Support, Divorce

What is the difference between legal and physical custody?

In accordance with Massachusetts General Laws c. 208, § 31, legal and physical custody are defined as follows:

  • Sole legal custody:  one parent shall have the right and responsibility to make major decisions regarding the child’s welfare including matters of education, medical care and emotional, moral and religious development.
  • Shared legal custody:  continued mutual responsibility and involvement by both parents in major decisions regarding the children’s welfare including matters of education, medical care and emotional, moral and religious development.
  •  Sole physical custody:  a child shall reside with and be under the supervision of one parent, subject to reasonable visitation by the other parent, unless the court determines that such visitation would not be in the best interests of the child.
  •  Shared physical custody:  a child shall have periods of residing with and being under the supervision of each parent; provided, however, that physical custody shall be shared by the parents in such a way as to assure a child frequent and continued contact with both parents.

Leave a comment

Filed under Custody, Divorce